Oatmeal Scones
Not just for breakfast, old-fashioned oatmeal adds crunch and character to everything. But also excellent for breakfast.
recipe here

Oatmeal Scones

Not just for breakfast, old-fashioned oatmeal adds crunch and character to everything. But also excellent for breakfast.

recipe here

Wish we could make this Flat Zucchini Omelet for all the East Coasters who suffered through Sandy last night.
How did you fare last night?

Wish we could make this Flat Zucchini Omelet for all the East Coasters who suffered through Sandy last night.

How did you fare last night?

Breakfast Burrito
he inspiration for these handheld burritos came from those served at the Santa Fe Farmers Market, in New Mexico, where they are truly the early bird’s reward—feasting on a portable breakfast while scoring the pick of the produce is a magical start to the day. Though either Mexican or Spanish chorizo would work, we prefer the smoothness of the Mexican sausage and the way its flavor, rich with chiles, soaks into the potatoes. Avocado adds a fresh, bright note. View more of our favorite recipes from this issue.
burrito recipe here

Breakfast Burrito

he inspiration for these handheld burritos came from those served at the Santa Fe Farmers Market, in New Mexico, where they are truly the early bird’s reward—feasting on a portable breakfast while scoring the pick of the produce is a magical start to the day. Though either Mexican or Spanish chorizo would work, we prefer the smoothness of the Mexican sausage and the way its flavor, rich with chiles, soaks into the potatoes. Avocado adds a fresh, bright note. View more of our favorite recipes from this issue.

burrito recipe here

What We’re Cooking: Baked Apple Pancake

Crisp and juicy with a characteristically sweet finish, apples meet each fall season with customary anticipation. It’s time to explore apples beyond their raw form, as seasonal varieties begin to hit store shelves and farm stands. When baked, apples reveal a saccharine flesh.

read more

What We’re Cooking: Baked Apple Pancake

Crisp and juicy with a characteristically sweet finish, apples meet each fall season with customary anticipation. It’s time to explore apples beyond their raw form, as seasonal varieties begin to hit store shelves and farm stands. When baked, apples reveal a saccharine flesh.

read more

Sour-Cream Pancakes With Sour-Cream Maple Syrup
Kemp’s “You-Won’t-Believe-They’re-Whole-Wheat” Muffins


MAKES1 DOZEN
ACTIVE TIME:15 MIN
 
START TO FINISH:45 MIN

Who doesn’t love a blueberry muffin chockablock with enough berries to stain your tongue purple? Making muffins is one of the easiest ways to celebrate the blueberry season, whether or not you’ve picked the berries yourself. “But whole-wheat muffins?” you ask. If the words light and tender don’t jive with your impressions of whole-wheat anything, you’ve got a surprise in store: These muffins, made with whole-wheat pastry flour, deliver all that you want and expect in a muffin, along with the dividend of extra fiber, vitamins, and a delicate wheaty flavor. Learn about the origins of this recipe in our series The Home Cook.


FOR MUFFINS
1 3/4 cups whole-wheat pastry flour
1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1 large egg
1/2 cup whole milk
5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1 1/2 cups blueberries (about 7 ounces)


FOR TOPPING
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon


for instructions keep reading



RECIPE BY KEMP MINIFIE
PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHANIE FOLEY

Kemp’s “You-Won’t-Believe-They’re-Whole-Wheat” Muffins

MAKES1 DOZEN
  • ACTIVE TIME:15 MIN
  •  
  • START TO FINISH:45 MIN
Who doesn’t love a blueberry muffin chockablock with enough berries to stain your tongue purple? Making muffins is one of the easiest ways to celebrate the blueberry season, whether or not you’ve picked the berries yourself. “But whole-wheat muffins?” you ask. If the words light and tender don’t jive with your impressions of whole-wheat anything, you’ve got a surprise in store: These muffins, made with whole-wheat pastry flour, deliver all that you want and expect in a muffin, along with the dividend of extra fiber, vitamins, and a delicate wheaty flavor. 

Learn about the origins of this recipe in our series The Home Cook.

FOR MUFFINS

  • 1 3/4 cups whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 cups blueberries (about 7 ounces)

FOR TOPPING

  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Figgy Scones

MAKES 20 SCONES
ACTIVE TIME:25 MIN
 
START TO FINISH:1 HR

Drop scones are a boon for busy bakers, since they’re a snap to make and almost foolproof. These bake up light and fluffy. A touch of maple syrup and pieces of fig make them just sweet enough—ideal for breakfast or an afternoon snack.



3/4 cup well-shaken buttermilk
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1/2 lb dried Calmyrna figs, stems discarded and figs cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 1 1/2 cups)
2 large egg yolks





Put oven racks in upper and lower thirds of oven and preheat oven to 400°F.


Whisk together buttermilk, syrup, and 1/2 cup cream in a small bowl. Mix together flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, and baking soda in bowl of a stand mixer with paddle attachment at low speed (or whisk in a large bowl) until combined. Add butter and mix (or blend with your fingertips or a pastry blender) until mixture resembles coarse meal with some small (roughly pea-size) butter lumps. Mix in figs, then add buttermilk mixture and mix until just combined. (Do not overmix.)


Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper and drop 10 (1/4-cup) mounds of batter onto each sheet, leaving 1 inch between mounds.


Whisk together yolks and remaining 2 tablespoons cream, then brush over tops of scones (use all of egg wash).


Bake, switching position of baking sheets halfway through baking, until scones are puffed and golden, 20 to 25 minutes total. Transfer to a rack and cool to warm.


COOKS’ NOTE:
Scones are best eaten the day they’re made.
RECIPE BY IAN KNAUER AND MAGGIE RUGGIERO
PHOTOGRAPH BY ROMULO YANES

Figgy Scones

MAKES 20 SCONES
  • ACTIVE TIME:25 MIN
  •  
  • START TO FINISH:1 HR
Drop scones are a boon for busy bakers, since they’re a snap to make and almost foolproof. These bake up light and fluffy. A touch of maple syrup and pieces of fig make them just sweet enough—ideal for breakfast or an afternoon snack.
  • 3/4 cup well-shaken buttermilk
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1/2 lb dried Calmyrna figs, stems discarded and figs cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • Put oven racks in upper and lower thirds of oven and preheat oven to 400°F.
  • Whisk together buttermilk, syrup, and 1/2 cup cream in a small bowl. Mix together flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, and baking soda in bowl of a stand mixer with paddle attachment at low speed (or whisk in a large bowl) until combined. Add butter and mix (or blend with your fingertips or a pastry blender) until mixture resembles coarse meal with some small (roughly pea-size) butter lumps. Mix in figs, then add buttermilk mixture and mix until just combined. (Do not overmix.)
  • Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper and drop 10 (1/4-cup) mounds of batter onto each sheet, leaving 1 inch between mounds.
  • Whisk together yolks and remaining 2 tablespoons cream, then brush over tops of scones (use all of egg wash).
  • Bake, switching position of baking sheets halfway through baking, until scones are puffed and golden, 20 to 25 minutes total. Transfer to a rack and cool to warm.
COOKS’ NOTE:
  • Scones are best eaten the day they’re made.

RECIPE BY IAN KNAUER AND MAGGIE RUGGIERO

PHOTOGRAPH BY ROMULO YANES

All Things Peanut Butter
All grown up and on its own, peanut butter stars in breakfasts, dinners and desserts in this week’s roundup of our favorite recipes from across the Web.
keep reading

All Things Peanut Butter

All grown up and on its own, peanut butter stars in breakfasts, dinners and desserts in this week’s roundup of our favorite recipes from across the Web.

keep reading

Dutch Baby with Lemon Sugar

A Dutch Baby—basically a cross between a pancake and a popover—is tremendously popular in Seattle; according to local lore, it originated at a restaurant there called Manca’s. Serve it with fresh berries or nothing more than jam or a lavish sprinkling of lemon sugar.

full recipe here
Recipe by Andrea Albin
Photo by Romulo Yanes
*one of our favorites

Dutch Baby with Lemon Sugar

A Dutch Baby—basically a cross between a pancake and a popover—is tremendously popular in Seattle; according to local lore, it originated at a restaurant there called Manca’s. Serve it with fresh berries or nothing more than jam or a lavish sprinkling of lemon sugar.

full recipe here

Recipe by Andrea Albin

Photo by Romulo Yanes

*one of our favorites

"

Eggs? I admit the Gauls have a way with the omelette. I admit their excellence there, albeit it is rather on the frothy and frivolous side. And I acknowledge their artistry in all lighter concoctions, such as desserts. But these are the icings and the toppings and finishes of culture, not culture itself. French breads may be fine. But a slice of solid Dutch bread, with honest Dutch butter on it, is like a handsome solid island in the froth and foam of the sea of French crusts on breads and pastries.

If this be treason, make the most of it. It is high time somebody spoke out.

The trouble with Gallic meats is that they are pretty tasteless to start with.

"

Poet and writer Robert P. Tristram Coffin on the British Breakfast, originally published in 1948

full story here